Motorhome Documentation when Travelling Abroad

Pen, Diary and GlassesWhen you’re in the UK life is reasonably easy in terms of documentation. By law you have seven days to take your driver’s license to a police station in the event of any trouble and you can normally get home with relative ease if you break down. When abroad however, that’s not always the case, and if your motorhome is your only method of transport you can end up stuck without the documents you need. Here is our guide of what you should be taking when you travel abroad:

General Documents

You should always travel with a passport, driver’s license – that’s you’re card and your counterpart paper license – and your motorhome insurance details. If you’re hiring a van, make sure your hire company gives you all you need in terms of breakdown cover and an emergency number to call in the event of an incident. It’s often a good idea to keep with you a paper set of contact numbers: mobiles are often rendered useless by lack of battery or signal when you need them the most.

Country Specific Documents

On top of this, there may be specific requirements for each country you travel to. Outside of the EU, if you’re a British citizen you may well need a visa. Though you’re unlikely to have to produce this on demand, it can be a useful way of proving you’re not from the area and are perhaps unfamiliar with local rules. Paper maps are also immensely useful and if you’re not a linguist then a motorhome-specific phrasebook will really help you if you break down.

Mechanics and Repairs

You should also ensure your log book and your motorhome manual are stowed away somewhere in your glovebox. There are essential for mechanics and if you do need to take on a repair while abroad it’s vital that it goes in the log book. That way you can remain under any warranty you may have on your motorhome.

You should never travel without the right documents to hand. It can help to compile a folder of useful information and stow it away each time you need it. It’s much better to be prepared than to end up getting stuck.